Most Australians are either unvaccinated or regret taking the COVID-19 injections, according to a survey last week by news.com.au. 

The poll, which posed several COVID-related questions to users online, received between 42,000 to 50,000 responses for each question. 

Responses revealed that only 35% of Australians are happy with their decision to get injected and would do it again. But the other 65% of respondents either refused the injections or regret taking them. Notably, not a single “unvaccinated” respondent regretted their decision. 

37% said they had not taken any injections, 26% had three, and 20% had two. 

Over two-thirds of respondents said the Australian government was too heavy-handed with its COVID-19 response. 25% said “they did the best they could” and 8% said they did “as well as any other country”. 

Australia was unexpectedly severe in its response to COVID-19, which included beating anti-mandate protesters who violated some of the harshest restrictions outside China. Along with lockdown orders over a single COVID case, the Australian government developed a mobile app which required those in quarantine to provide proof of their location within 15 minutes.  

In August 2021 the New South Wales Council shot dead several rescue dogs so that volunteers from an animal shelter would not travel to pick them up. 

Australia was also widely considered one of the most fanatical countries when it came to the COVID-19 injections. The government created a Spread Freedom campaign, in which Australian citizens could buy back their freedom with each vaccine dose they had injected.  

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In September 2021 Australian Premier Scott Morris promised citizens that if 70% of the country took both injections, he would allow up to five fully vaccinated people to gather in the home and up to 20 people to congregate outdoors.  

“Our roadmap outlines the freedoms that twice vaccinated people will enjoy once we reach 70 per cent double dose which means a meal with loved ones or a drink with friends is just around the corner,” teased Deputy Premier John Barilaro last year.  

Buyer’s remorse among the injected has only recently begun to become apparent. 

Last month journalist Alex Berenson posed two questions to Twitter users about a topic seldomly discussed: regret over the COVID-19 injections by those who believed in them.  

“Maybe unanswerable question: How much quiet mRNA regret is out there?” the author wrote. “I don’t mean in folks who never wanted to be jabbed and were forced, I mean those who did so willingly in early 2021. How many of those folks feel now badly fooled?  

“Second q: what will that regret mean?” 

Overwhelmingly, the regret rolled in, as reported by America’s Frontline News.